Flexatone HFP
Icon
  • System Detail

System: WolframTones

Authors

Description

About WolframTones When prominent scientist Stephen Wolfram published A New Kind of Science in 2002, it was immediately hailed as a major intellectual landmark. Today the paradigm shift that Wolfram's work initiated is starting revolutions in a remarkable range of areas of science, technology--and the arts. WolframTones is an experiment in applying Wolfram's discoveries to the creation of music. At the core of A New Kind of Science is the idea of exploring a new abstract universe: a "computational universe" of simple programs. In A New Kind of Science, Wolfram shows how remarkably simple programs in his "computational universe" capture the essence of the complexity--and beauty--of many systems in nature. WolframTones works by taking simple programs from Wolfram's computational universe, and using music theory and Mathematica algorithms to render them as music. Each program in effect defines a virtual world, with its own special story--and WolframTones captures it as a musical composition. It's all original music--fresh from "mining" Wolfram's computational universe. Sometimes it's reminiscent of familiar musical styles; sometimes it's like nothing ever heard before. But from just the tiniest corner of the computational universe WolframTones can make everyone on Earth their own unique cellphone ringtone. It's a taste of what it's like to explore the computational universe--and a hint what's to come... Protected Material Copyrights--All content offered on this site is copyright (c) 2005 Wolfram Research, Inc. All rights reserved. By using this Site, you disclaim any authorship rights to content presented at your request on this site. Patents--The functionality of this Site is protected by patent law. Trademarks--WolframTones, "A New Kind of Music", Mathematica, webMathematica, and other marks that appear throughout this Site are trademarks of Wolfram Research. "A New Kind of Science" is a trademark of Stephen Wolfram, LLC. "Search the computational universe" is a servicemark of Wolfram Research. All rights reserved. Content Licensing Unless otherwise specified, this Site and content presented on this Site are for your personal and noncommercial use. You may not modify, copy, distribute, transmit, display, perform, reproduce, publish, license, create derivative works from, transfer, or sell any information or content obtained from this Site. For commercial and other uses, contact us. You must be at least 18 years of age to license content from this Site. All content licensing is subject to a License Agreement. When you present payment information, you warrant that you have authority to do so, and that the billing information you provide is accurate. Wolfram Research will not issue refunds based upon inaccuracies represented by you. By accepting the Content License, you authorize Wolfram Research to charge you for the license. Delivery of content may involve sending text messages to your mobile device; you agree to receive such messages. By initiating an order on this Site, you warrant that you are authorized to send text messages and content to the mobile device described in the order. To enable certain capabilities, this Site may require you to open an account. You must complete the registration process by providing Wolfram Research with current, complete, and accurate information as prompted by the applicable registration form. You then will choose a password and a user name. You are entirely responsible for maintaining the confidentiality of your password and account. Furthermore, you are entirely responsible for any and all activities that occur under your account. You agree to notify Wolfram Research immediately of any unauthorized use of your account or any other breach of security. Wolfram Research will not be liable for any loss that you may incur as a result of someone else using your password or account, either with or without your knowledge. The information provided by you to Wolfram Research is subject to our Privacy Policy. Your use of this Site indicates your agreement to be bound by our Privacy Policy.

“The computing machine is a marvelous invention and seems almost superhuman. But in reality it is as limited as the mind of the individual who feeds it material. Like the computer, the machines we use for making music can only give back what we put into them.”

(Full citation)

“... and the hope of an extraordinary aesthetic success based on extraordinary technology is a cruel deceit.”

(Full citation)

“Composers are now able, as never before, to satisfy the dictates of that inner ear of the imagination. They are also lucky so far in not being hampered by esthetic codification -- at least not yet! But I am afraid it will not be long before some musical mortician begins embalming electronic music in rules.”

(Full citation)

“... the use of numerical machines no longer stands in need of justification. It is not a mystery. If there is a mystery, it is in the mental structures of music and not in the computers, which are only tools, extensions of the hand and the slide rule.”

(Full citation)

“The use of computers is the logical outcome of a historical development. It by no means heralds a new musical epoch; it simply offers a fast, reliable and versatile means of solving problems that already demanded solution. The person who writes the computer programme must bear the development of musical language up to the present in mind, and try to advance a stage further.”

(Full citation)

“With the development of electronic and computer music, multidemnsionality of sound representation turned out to be both natural and useful. But music goes beyond multidimensionality -- it is even more complex.”

(Full citation)

“Music is then no longer primarily conceived as a guide for premeditated emotions, but as the density of the possible relationships which first become actuality during production under the influence of chance, and which during performance are presented to the listener as sounds beyond any environmental associatiations, independent of bodily actions required to produce sounds...”

(Full citation)

“... but beware, technique can submerge the user: We must defend ourselves; it is good to use techniques, but we have to dominate them, to stay alert.”

(Full citation)

“The danger is great of letting oneself be trapped by the tools and of becoming stuck in the sands of technology that has come like an intruder into the relatively calm waters of the thought in instrumental music.”

(Full citation)

“... the individual and the society are deprived of the formidable power of free imagination that musical composition offers them. We are able to tear down this iron curtain, thanks to the technology of computers...”

(Full citation)

“The characteristics of every sound depend on the way in which the sound was produced. Each art-form exploits its special production methods in order to endow the phenomena with unmistakable characteristics. Artistic economy demands that the means be appropriate to the end, and that the exploitation of the means be an end in itself.”

(Full citation)